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Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Putting a pistol caliber cartridge in a rifle is easy…but a rifle round in a pistol?  Now that takes a bit more effort… In a world of 9mm AR-15s and 10mm carbines , ammo is no longer confined to it’s standard “handgun” or “rifle” designation. (L to R) . 22LR, 9mm, Five-Seven, 5.

[Review] FN Five-SeveN: High Speed & Low Recoil

[Review] FN Five-SeveN: High Speed & Low RecoilTrending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Putting a pistol caliber cartridge in a rifle is easy…but a rifle round in a pistol?  Now that takes a bit more effort… In a world of 9mm AR-15s and 10mm carbines , ammo is no longer confined to it’s standard “handgun” or “rifle” designation. (L to R) .22LR, 9mm, Five-Seven, 5.56 While rifles chambered in classic handgun rounds seem to be all the craze right now, we seem to forget that the opposite exists…kind of.  Although not exactly a rifle round, the FN 5.7x28mm cartridge is also not quite a pistol round either. Most Innovative Handgun FN Five-seveN 1380 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1380 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing Clearly, the Five-seveN is truly a unicorn of the gun world.  It is a lightweight polymer pistol that shoots FN’s own 5.7x28mm round. Five-SeveN Sure is a Nice Looking Gun! History When NATO requested an alternative to the 9x19mm round, FN Herstal was the first to respond, presenting the 5.7x28mm cartridge.  The 5.7 round was originally developed for the P90 until the Five-SeveN pistol went into production in 1998. FN P90 In the early 2000s, NATO conducted a series of tests with the goal of standardizing a personal defense weapon round and replacing the iconic 9mm. The 5.7x28mm surely impressed—it was highly effective, performed at extreme temperatures, and could even be manufactured on the same production lines as the loved 5.56x45mm NATO round. Ballistic Details Effective range when shot from a Five-SeveN: 55 yards (maximum range of 1651 yards!) Total Weight: 6.0 grams=93 grains (half the weight of a 9mm) Projectile Mass: 28-40 gains Velocity: 2,350 ft/s (FN 28gn, JHP) The Design The Five-SeveN is a full-sized pistol and a compact-sized weight.  It has a nearly completely polymer frame, with some small steel internal components. While the grip is considerably thinner than most full-sized pistols and a bit long, which could be a bit uncomfortable for some hand sizes, it features ambidextrous controls that are conveniently placed for thumb or trigger finger manipulation. Although the grip can feel a bit odd at first because it is so untraditional, it grew on me as I manipulated the gun and actually shot it. Adjustable rear sights for both windage and elevation, which is important because of the round’s uncommon ballistics. Since the 5.7×28 cartridge is so small it is easy to fit a lot of ammo into a single magazine, especially when using a double stack-double feed design. Five-SeveN 20 Round Magazine The design of the magazines is equally brilliant and lightweight.  They hold 20 rounds and load in a similar fashion to standard AR magazines–you simply push the round straight down instead of maneuvering it in and under like in most pistol magazines. FN Five-seveN OEM Magazines 35 at GunMag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 35 at GunMag Warehouse Compare prices (3 found) GunMag Warehouse (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The Five-SeveN is also easy to disassemble with a simple takedown lever. Range Time Shooting the Five-SeveN is an absolute BLAST . Imagine the almost non-existent recoil of a .22 LR juxtaposed with the noise of an AR.  The first few shots fascinated me yet confused me. I had never shot anything like it and could easily tell it is one-of-a-kind. Five-SeveN in hand The lightweight frame makes for a comfortable range session while magazines are a breeze to load. Sadly the rigger is not the greatest but features a pretty crisp break and moderate pull weight, my groups were pretty consistent with how I would normally shoot a handgun; maybe slightly better at longer ranges – likely due to the high velocity of the 5.7 ammo. I could see this gun being liked across the spectrum, from novice shooters to seasoned vets. Looks and Accessories The Five-SeveN has a sleek and almost futuristic look to it.  It comes in either an all-black finish or a tan frame and black slide (my personal favorite). The rail can be outfitted with a flashlight and aftermarket night sights are available for purchase as well. Threaded barrels do exist for this gun and I can only imagine what a great time it would be shoot suppressed. FN 5.7 Suppressed, source: IMFDB.com Practicality The 5.7x28mm cartridge was designed to meet a goal and in that role it is unequaled – but the Cold War is over and the need for armor penetration in an EDC is limited at best. There is quite a bit of debate surrounding the topic of whether the Five-SeveN can be used as an effective carry gun: Five-SeveN with 5.7x28mm Ammo and 20 Round Magazine On the pro side, it is extremely lightweight, has a decently heavy trigger pull and safety, very high magazine capacity, and effective stopping power. Looking at the cons we have expensive to shoot ammo that is only available in FMJ, and the high possibility of over penetration due to such a fast round. As with most things, it is a personal choice as to whether this is a viable carry gun or just a fun range toy to make your friends jealous.  However, we tend to be on the side of the fence that says there are Better Options for Full-Size EDC . By the Numbers Ergonomics 4/5 Nice grip texture, super lightweight, but an oddly shaped grip could be uncomfortable for some. Best Value (IWB) Alien Gear Cloak Tuck 3.5 51 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 51 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Accuracy 4.5/5 Better than most handguns, especially at longer ranges. Reliability 5/5 I had no issues with it jamming, ever.  After doing some research I did not conclude that there were any known reliability issues and NATO testing definitely backs up the effectiveness of the round. Customization 3/5 This category is lacking a bit because the gun is not very common and the design is unique.  It might just be better to leave it as it comes from the factory and trust FN’s creative design. It does have a rail though, so you can at the very least put a light on the Five-seveN — remember, you can’t hit what you can’t see! Since this is a full-sized gun, I like a full-sized light like the StreamLight TLR-1 HL . Streamlight TLR-1 HL 125 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 125 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Looks 4/5 I like the almost futuristic and very sleek look, but it does not necessarily look special, especially for the price. Price 2/5 This is the real kicker.  The actual gun is expensive and the ammo also expensive.  While it could make a great splurge purchase, it is not exactly a cheap plinker. If This Is You, The Five-seveN Might Be For You… Overall 4/5 Really the only downside to this gun is the price, not only out the door of your FFL but also in trying to keep it fed. Federal American Eagle 5.7x28mm 40 Grain TMJ 27 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 27 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing There is also the fact that although 5.7x28mm was a perfect solution the problem it was designed for – there just isn’t much of a need for it currently. But, if you have the money and the desire, it will always turn heads at the range. Conclusion The FN Five-SeveN is a fantastic, highly underrated pistol. It has beautiful accuracy, sleek styling, and bomb-proof reliability. The downside? Both the gun and the exotic ammo are on the pricey side. However, we feel that the Five-SeveN is well worth it. If you have the chance to shoot a Five-SeveN, you should.  It is unlike any gun I have ever shot and is truly a remarkable weapon. The unicorn of the polymer pistol world is definitely not for everyone but has surely caught the attention of many.  An amazing combination of a lightweight frame, high-speed but low recoil round, and loud bang come together to make the FN Five-SeveN noteworthy and intriguing. Do you have a Five-SeveN? Plan on getting one?  Let us know in the comments!  Check out more of our favorite guns & gear in Editor’s Picks .

The Rise of 80 Percent Firearms

The Rise of 80 Percent Firearms

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d6f3cbbf_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d6f3cbbf_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Do-It-Yourself 80 percent firearm builds represent a great chance to increase your gun knowledge, and they have been becoming more and more popular in recent years. For as long as I can remember, I have been fascinated with the Kalashnikov family of firearms. As a teenager on the cusp of legally transitioning to manhood, I decided to practice my American rights by purchasing my first rifle. Naturally, I gravitated toward the AK style of firearms. Being a few weeks from high school graduation and perpetually broke, I aspired to get the best deal I could while getting a quality firearm. During the weeks between deciding to buy a rifle and actually turning 18, I had time to scour every gun publication I could get my hands on in an attempt to make an informed decision. During my search, I came across these AK kits that, for between $59.99 and $99.99, promised a truly custom, one-of-a-kind rifle on a budget. My interest was piqued, to say the least. In the end, though, I settled on an unconverted, plain Saiga AK and plunged headfirst into kitchen-table gunsmithing. But in the back of my mind, I never forgot those alluring jumbles of Cosmoline-soaked parts, nor would I forget the promise of a cheap, built-at-home rifle. Back then, the Internet wasn’t anything close to what it is today, and finding information on how to make a kit actually work was nearly impossible, so I shelved the idea for the time. Years later, I was still a single young man, but I now had a job for Uncle Sam and a check burning a hole in my pocket. In my mind, the only reasonable thing to do with that money was to buy guns. Once again, I saw those kits. They cost a little more by this time, but it was still a negligible price at most. I did some more research on the subject and decided that while I was living in a military barrack, there was no way I could turn these kits into guns without losing my job or facing felony charges. Then, two years ago, I finally had the money, a house, and the information I needed to make this dream of building my own AKM a reality. Anyone who knows me understands I’m not a man who jumps into something without careful consideration; this project was no different. I spent years learning everything I could, carefully building a tool list, making sure every angle was covered and every part accounted for. And finally, after years of dreaming about it, the big day came. I was hiding behind my truck, a length of paracord held tightly in my hand, the other end tied off to an ugly hunk of metal—vaguely resembling an AKM—securely attached to a wooden pallet. When that first shot rang out in the hot desert air, I knew instantly that I was hooked. I had just built my own firearm from chunks of metal in a box, and it hadn’t killed me. Related GunDigest Articles Traditions Firearms Now Shipping Crackshot Rifles Photo Gallery: RIAC September Premier Firearms Auction Preview 5 Reasons to Own Survival Firearms To this day, I refuse to tally up how much I spent on building that rifle, partially because I don’t want my wife to have another reason to kill me, but also because I don’t care. Conservatively speaking, I would estimate that in tools, refinishing products, gauges, and everything else, I spent approximately three times the cost of a nice factory rifle. Holding in your hands a fully functional rifle that you built yourself is an indescribable feeling that, in my mind, was worth every penny I’d spent—and then some. During the course of this project, I’ve had the pleasure of meeting many firearms enthusiasts who have freely offered more advice than I could have ever wanted on the subject, and who continue to be a source of guidance and inspiration. This growing community of 80 percent builders has caused no shortage of controversy. In 2014, a California senator famously humiliated himself while making a speech regarding the danger of what he called “ghost guns.” While his speech was filled with ignorant comments and blatant lies, he succeeded in garnering negative attention from a number of gun control groups toward the gun-building community. The AR-15 80-percent lower and the 80-percent 7.62×39 AKM pattern flat, and rails that are welded to the flat. Two of the most popular 80-percent receivers, both require completely different equipment to finish. For the sake of argument, I would like to clearly define what exactly an 80 percent firearm really is. Legally, the only part considered a regulated firearm is the receiver. A receiver is defined differently depending on the firearm, but it’s generally the one part that holds the trigger, chamber and magazine all together so the firearm can actually function. Think of the receiver as the heart and soul of the firearm. Because of its essential role, the federal government defines it as the one essential part that is legally regulated the same as a finished firearm. This means that everything else is just a part and completely unregulated. A receiver generally looks like a hunk of oddly shaped metal with holes drilled in specific places and a serial number prominently located in a visible area. This is considered a finished 100-percent receiver, and it requires a background check and Federal Firearms License (FFL) holder to transfer it to the new owner. An 80 percent receiver is, as the name would suggest, an unfinished receiver. In the eyes of the law, it is a hunk of metal that in its current form is unable to be used as a firearm. Normally, an 80 percent receiver design is submitted to the BATFE for approval before being sold to the public to ensure it cannot easily be converted into a functional firearm. As a general rule, 80 percent receivers require specialized tools, a solid foundation in the fundamentals of firearm mechanics, and careful construction. They’re not for the faint of heart. Because the components that make up the majority of a firearm are unregulated parts, and the 80 percent receiver is also unregulated, all of these items can be ordered online and sent directly to your front door with the swipe of a credit card. You can see why there is controversy surrounding this type of firearm build. This political turmoil surrounding home-built guns has, like most gun control rhetoric, only served to make the guns even more popular. We live in an age where information on almost any topic can be found with the click of a button. It’s all too easy for someone to hop on the Internet and find step-by-step instructions for every part of the gunmaking process. With modern machinery and materials, someone with the correct tools, a lot of patience, and a mechanical knack can, with some difficulty, make a fully functional firearm. Gone are the days of thumbing through a poorly illustrated gun magazine trying to figure out what the author is talking about. Now you can watch a clear video of someone walking you through the whole process. A 20-ton press, along with this specialized jig, is used to stamp the AKM receiver into shape. This is one of the first steps to the build. It’s important to lube the receiver so that the sides are bent correctly and don’t shear off under the immense pressure. I’ve found that wheel bearing grease works best for this step. However, it’s not as simple as some would have you believe. My first AK was an abomination. For some of the parts, I tried an advanced welding method I was unfamiliar with. Out of impatience, I also used the incorrect tool for another process. These two mistakes resulted in an unstable receiver; and while the rifle still fired, it was unsafe. Ultimately, it took $25.00 and around 20 extra hours to fix, but that mistake taught me a great deal. I mention this because even with experience, with easy methods of learning the process and with a garage full of tools, making a firearm still isn’t an easy process. It’s expensive, time consuming and will greatly test the patience of even an experienced gun owner. With that being said, you might ask, “What’s the allure?”

The 4 Best Hunting Blind Chairs – Reviews 2020 Photo by US Army Corps of Engineers / CC BY So why get a decent hunting blind chair? Obviously comfort. Imagine this: it’s early, it’s cold, and part of you wants to reach over and hit snooze on that alarm clock. But you don’t. You climb to your feet, dress, gun up, and head to your hunting blind, cause today we are bringing dinner home. Sitting in that old wood blind, on that 2 x 4 bench gets old fast, and if you’re tired of that you’ve come to the right place. We are going to talk about hunting blind chairs. A good blind chair needs to be lightweight and easy to tote. You don’t want to carry 50 pounds worth of Lazy Boy. A good blind chair should also fold into a compact package this way you can carry through the woods without crashing and tumbling. Lastly, as we mentioned, it needs to be comfortable! Here are our recommendations for the 4 best hunting blind chairs on the market: Primo Double Bull Hunting Blind Stool Primos Double Bull Tri Stool, Truth Camoflage Price: $36.89 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:16 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Let’s keep things simple. Simple is affordable, and simple is less likely to fail when you need it most. The "Primos Double Bull" Tri Stool is simple. It’s a canvas and aluminum chair that folds when it’s not needed. The folding nature also makes it easy to tote to and from the hunting blind. The Primos Double Bull Tri Stool is designed in that triangular shape for a reason, to resist restricting movement. The triangular shaped seating allows you to pivot without depending on a pivot device on the chair. The Tri Stool can hold up to 300 pounds. The legs are easily locked for carry and an included shoulder strap makes it easy to manage with your rifle or bow. The chair has a flared backrest so you lean back and relax a bit while waiting those long morning and evening hours. The chair is wide enough for the women who run the world and comfy enough for those long hours of waiting that hunting often involves. The triangular shape also helps ensure steady blood flow to the legs so you won’t be stumbling when you recover that deer or turkey or goose. The chair weighs a mere 6.5 pounds and comes in a camo and black finish. It’s also built to be high enough for the most common blinds. It’s also one of the cheapest options for blind chairs. It’s like the best hunting blind chair for the money. Primos Ground Blind Product Review Watch this video on YouTube

Precision Rifle Build on a Budget- Selecting a base rifle

Precision Rifle Build on a Budget- Selecting a base rifle

My next series of articles are going to be covering the topic of building a precision rifle. I will be covering everything from putting together a relatively low cost budget build to having a high dollar custom rig built. There are many misconceptions in regards to precision shooting. One of the biggest errors I see is the idea of having to have a $6000.00 dollar large caliber rifle to be able to shoot long distances effectively and accurately. I’m here to tell you that is simply false. One of the most enjoyable things I like to see is a new shooter getting into the sport of precision marksmanship. It is disheartening to see a new shooter with the will and desire to learn but be derailed because of the misconception of the cost it takes to participate. Yes, we all want to have the sexiest rifle on the range but the bottom line is a rifle is only as good as the marksman driving it. The most important part of precision marksmanship isn’t the rifle or the optic attached to it. It’s the marksman and his knowledge of the fundamentals and how he applies them that will allow his equipment to shine. If a shooter was to ask me what caliber he should choose to start learning the art of long range precision marksmanship I would tell him without a reasonable doubt a 308. There are many reasons I would select that caliber. The first would be that the Match grade 308 is an inherently accurate round out to 1000 yards which can be purchased off the shelf at a relatively low cost. The second reason is the 308 in my opinion is the best round for learning the effects of weather and how they affect the projectile in flight. This is also known as “external ballistics”. There is no cheating with the 308. The shooter must know all of the environmental conditions and be able to correctly judge range to target, wind direction and speed to be effective. This caliber is the perfect learning tool. The third reason is the 308 has relatively minor recoil. This is important because if a shooter is getting beat up behind the rifle he is less likely to concentrate on the correct fundamentals of placing a well-aimed shot and more likely to buck, flinch or jerk knowing he is about to feel some pain. Remember it’s not how sexy or expensive the rifle is. The important thing is the marksman and what he can do with the rifle. I always have to laugh when I am competing against another shooter who’s wielding some high dollar big bore rifle that costs him $2.50 every time he pulls the trigger. Then there’s me with my little old 308 dinging the same steel he is and spending half the money. Now I’m not saying there aren’t advantages to shooting a custom rifle launching 220 grain pills down range. What I am saying is that a rifle is just a tool and the product it produces is only as good as the craftsman that uses it. The most important aspect to precision marksmanship is learning the art. After the fundamentals are mastered the shooter can make small gains by upgrading his equipment. The investment that will always yield the most returns for a shooter is learning the proper fundamentals of marksmanship. In a nutshell that means your money is better spent on training and ammo first before all the bling of a sexy rifle. The first rifle I will introduce is what I like to call a budget rifle. It isn’t the sexiest rifle in the world but it is still very capable of delivering precision rifle fire. It is also an affordable investment in comparison to some of the other rifles and equipment that I will talk about in part 2 and 3 of this article. If a shooter has a limited budget and is looking to break into the game I would recommend a Remington 700 SPS Varmint. This rifle sells retail for $700.00. If you put forth the effort and do some digging you can find these rifles being sold used for as little as $450.00. Most of them are in like new condition and some are even outfitted with a decent optic. I recommend the Remington 700 SPS for a number of reasons. First out of the box the SPS Varmint is very accurate without any modifications. It’s outfitted with a decent stock and a heavy barrel. This rifle is capable of shooting sub “MOA” groups with factory match ammo right off the store room shelf. The next reason is the Remington 700 action is a strong and reliable action. It is also very easy to true and modify. I don’t know of a custom rifle builder that does not work on Remington 700 actions. This is important because down the road if a shooter wants to start upgrading his rifle with custom parts like a new match grade barrel, stock, trigger etc… the parts are readily available and there are loads of gunsmiths that will be happy to do the work. Now there are rifles and actions on the market that some custom rifle builders will refuse to work on. The Remington 700 is typically not one of them. It is a solid investment that will grow with the shooter as he grows. The shooter can then tweak the rifle to his liking as he becomes more proficient and learns what he wants in a precision rifle. The next item that needs to be addresses is optics or “glass”. The optic on a precision rifle is every bit as important as the rifle itself. There is nothing that disappoints me more than a shooter who drops big money on a rifle and then attaches a low quality pellet rifle scope to it. The bottom line is Glass is worth its weight in gold. You have to be able to see what you are shooting at to hit it. When you are looking at engaging targets at distances a half a mile or more, poor glass is not going to cut it. You will have a hard time identifying targets if your glass is of poor quality. Furthermore the adjustments that you dial on your scope with your turrets have to be precise. A poorly made scope will eventually not track true when you are dialing your turrets up and down and back and forth time and time again. If the internal parts of the optic are made of substandard parts they will wear out fast and fail. When you add recoil into the mix the problems get even bigger. There are enough variables that precision shooters have to take into consideration when engaging targets. An optic that doesn’t perform correctly should not be one of them. The optics I’m going to suggest for our budget rifle are quality optics that will perform and be reasonably affordable for the task at hand. Make no mistake optics are every bit as expensive as a rifle. The optics our military snipers are running on their precision rigs are of the highest quality. These optics are in the price range of $2500.00 or more. With that being said they are built with the best components in the industry. They are extremely rugged and capable of taking a lot of abuse for obvious reasons. These will not be the type of optics I will be suggesting for our budget rifle. I will talk about these optics more in part 2 and 3 of this article. There are a couple different scope options that I would suggest for our budget rifle. The optic should be at least a 10 power. It should have adjustable turrets for adding elevation and windage adjustments to the rifle. This is important because the precision shooter will need to be able to raise and lower his elevation when engaging targets at different ranges. The shooter will also need to be able to adjust for the different wind conditions he will surely be facing at the time of the shot. The first optic that fits this bill is the Leupold Mark 4 LR/T 4.5-14X40mm. http://www.leupold.com/ This optic is durable and has good quality glass for the intended purpose. It is also outfitted with a duplex reticle. This scope can be purchased brand new for around $700.00. I’ve seen these purchased used for as little as $450.00. Once again if you do some digging you can find some reasonable prices on used equipment. The second optic I would suggest is the Vortex Viper PST 2.5-10x44mm. http://www.vortexoptics.com/ Vortex is a fairly new company to break onto the scene recently. I’ve had the opportunity to get my hands on this scope and I have to say that for the money this piece of glass is hard to beat. It has good clear glass, exposed turrets that make dialing elevation and wind adjustments very easy. It is also outfitted with an MRAD or MOA reticle which aids in ranging unknown distance targets as well as using the holdover method for engaging targets. The “holdover method” is nothing more than using your reticle to add elevation and windage to the rifle instead of dialing your adjustments with your turrets. It is a more efficient way to engage targets when time is of the essence. I will discuss this topic more in depth in future articles. This scope is also outfitted with an illuminated reticle for engaging targets in low to no light situations. The bottom line is, for the price this scope is hard to beat. The Vortex Viper retails new for around $700.00 and I’ve seen it as low as $600.00. There are different variants of this scope that are higher powered but they will run you a little more money. The final two items that will be needed to make your build complete is a scope base and rings. There are a ton of manufactures out there that produce quality rings and bases. When it comes to rings the price ranges vary from $15.00 to $300.00. Rings are important because they are what keep your scope firmly in place without damaging it. You want a set of rings that will keep your optic in its place even if you accidentally drop or bump your rifle. You don’t need a set of rings that will prevent Godzilla from ripping it off your rifle but you need good solid rings. I would recommend a set of GG&G Aluminum Sniper Grade rings for our budget build. They are a decent set of affordable rings retailing for $85.00. If you want to go a little higher end I would look at the Vortex Precision Matched rifle Scope Rings which retail for $114.00 http://www.vortexoptics.com/ . When selecting a base for our rifle I would recommend a 20 MOA base for added elevation. I would look at the Brownells Remington 700 Heavy Duty 20 MOA scope base. It retails for around $50.00. http://www.brownells.com One more option but a little more costly would be the Nightforce Remington 700 scope Base which retails for $114.00. http://www.nightforceoptics.com/ There are many different options to take a look at when putting together a rifle on a budget. All of us have a different ideas of what a budget build is. This is my version and if you play your cards right you could put together a competitive rifle for around $1200.00 I hope you all gained something from my first of 3 articles on building a precision rifle. Be on the lookout for part 2 of this series of articles where I will be getting into upgrading our budget rifle with higher end components. I look forward to fielding any questions you all might have and once again feel free to add your thoughts on the subject. Juliet 1 This article was originally published on theloadoutroom.com

Survival Debate: 1911 or Glock

The infamous “Colt” 1911 and the Glock pistols represent the epoch debate over two classic diametrically opposed handgun designs.  Like vanilla and chocolate ice cream there are diehard followers of each flavor as well as for each of these pistols.   One can argue this model is better than the other, but it is a debate that will never produce a resolution much like the classic 9mm vs .45 ACP debate. Quick Navigation 1911 vs Glock: Head To Head The Battle of the Semi-Autos What Every Prepper Wants? The Glock Profile The Battlefield 1911 Summary Commentary 1911 vs Glock: Head To Head The Battle of the Semi-Autos Everybody has their own personal preferences in nearly every aspect of life from cars to television shows to blue jeans to best hamburgers.  That is I suppose in America the “spice of life” they talk about, because freedom as brought us so many choices.  Truth is though there are many other choices than these two, but I chose these because I know them well, they are popular, proven designs that are readily available.   Either would make a good survival support firearm . "What Every Prepper" Wants? From the perspective of the prepper, I constantly get inquiries about which heavy duty semi-auto pistol to choose for SHTF scenarios, Bug In and Out self-defense, property patrol and the whole nine yards as it were.   Pistols seem to dominate the discussion over wheel guns, but for me, those handguns are still a viable option for many.  However, the marketplace and many survival blog sites are replete with advice on selecting a semi-auto and for good reasons.  Therefore, newbies and veterans alike are swayed toward purchasing a semi-auto pistol for survival work.  I can argue all day until blue in the face why the semi-auto pistol is a top choice for self-defense, if and that is a big IF, the user is willing to officially learn how to use it, load it, shoot it, and maintain it. Also Read: CZ 75 Pistol Review Don’t thrash me here for picking the .45 ACP caliber choice.  I know and fully appreciate that others will want and will learn the effective use other choices, primarily the 9mm or the .40 Cal or others.  I picked the .45 ACP again, because most of the inquiries I get are about a heavy hitting pistol.  You simply cannot argue against 230 grains unless you cannot hit with it.  Keep also in perspective that some shooters are simply not suited to the .45 ACP, but that is their choice to evaluate and decide upon.  Many may wish to use multiple choices in this regard.   While one prepper may own and use the Ford F-250 super duty truck, others prefer a Subaru or small SUV.  Again, these are the choices of freedom. Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA "The Glock Profile" The Glock pistol began manufacture in Austria in 1983 by Glock GmbH.  Today there is a Glock manufacturing facility in Smyrna, Ga which opened in 2009.   There have been several versions of the Glock pistols known as “Generations’ or Gen 2-3 and now the Gen-4 brought out in 2010.  Each version incorporated new upgrades, or design changes or so-called improvements.  The Gen-4’s main upgrade was options in the configuration of the grip.  Such “changes” are in the eyes of the beholder and user.  Many Gen-4 buyers have sold them going back to the Gen-3 versions. The primary Glock chambered for the .45 ACP is their Model 21 .  It is the full sized model with a 4.49 inch barrel.   There is a shorter, compact version, too, the Model 30.  The Model 21 weighs in at 29 ounces.  That is 1.8+ pounds.  It is a sizable pistol not fitting all hands well.  What made the Glock pistol design famous is their ubiquitous polymer frame.  The barrels are steel as is the slide and all internal springs.  The sights are fixed, though aftermarket sights offer other options such as a Tru-Glo night sight .  The Glock pistol is comprised of only 35 parts for reliability and simplicity.  This is why many law enforcement agencies use them. Also Read: Smith & Wesson Governor Glock pistols are double-action, meaning with a round in the chamber, the shooter has only to pull the trigger.  The firearm will fire, eject the spent cartridge and reload a fresh round from the magazine ready to be fired again.  Factory magazines can hold either 10 or 13 rounds. When I work the gun shows in my area, I work for a certified Glock armorer company called GlockPro of Mississippi.  They sell only trigger kits, aftermarket sight kits, springs, do-dads, and official factory accessories.  They do all the parts change outs and fitting at the show while the customer walks around the show.  I see a lot of Glocks used by a lot of pistol owners.  Glock shooters don’t really criticize the pistol, but they seem to rush to us for a lighter trigger kit after just having bought a brand new pistol in the factory box.  They also favor one of the three sight enhancement kit versions we sell and install.  Night sights are a primary choice. Also Read: Survival Shotgun Selection Glocks shoot every time you pull the trigger, well for the most part.  They are very reliable guns if the shooter knows how to shoot it.  A strong grip is paramount in the pistol’s performance.  Limp-wristing this pistol will cause it to stovepipe.  Parts do break on the Glock and some come from the factory with “issues.”  I hear repeatedly that many Glock owners have returned their guns to the factory in Georgia for “adjustments.”  It can happen with anything. If I am asked I will be honest.  I do not personally like the Glock.  I have owned them, but the slippery plastic grip simply does not work for me and I have a big mitt.  The grip angle and surface are just not to my personal liking.  For me, the Glock is just ugly.  It is functional, but not awe inspiring to look at, but again that is a personal choice and does not distract from the gun’s use.  If I bought another Glock (which I doubt) I would go with a 9mm.  The .40 Cal is a solution to a non-existent problem.  So is the SIG round in my opinion. "The Battlefield 1911" If you want a good historical read on a handgun, look up the background of the original 1911 from conception until the current modern versions of today.  The classic 1911 pistol is likely the most prolifically copied handgun design of all time.  I suspect there are easily as many as 100+ manufacturers’ 1911 models being produced today.  The original refined 1911 model was designed for use as the primary sidearm for WWII though earlier models were produced and used earlier for military applications.  They were used mostly by officers, pilots, and higher ranking medical personnel.  Some line troops may have had access to them.  After the war they were widely used by returning troops and later by civilians in large numbers. The current Colt and the many copies of the 1911/1991 versions are primarily chambered for the .45 ACP though they have been and are available in other calibers such as the 9mm and the .38 Super as well as the .22 rimfire mostly in conversion kits.  The basic 1911 is an all steel pistol, blued finish, bright or matte with other options including stainless now and the old Parkerized finish.  Many other custom materials, coatings and finishes are offered by manufacturers.  The 1911 comes with a standard 5-inch barrel and slide, 7-shot magazine, slide lock, left hand side slide safety lock, grip safety and wood, plastic, or synthetic grips panels. Also Read: Smith & Wesson Bodyguard .380 The 1911 is a single action pistol.  This means the slide has to be racked or “cocked” back to the locked position which also cocks the hammer.  Upon release of the slide by the slide release lever, the slide moves forward stripping a cartridge round out of the top of the magazine and chambering it.  This loads the pistol into firing ready.  This is all over simplified.  The pistol is then ready to be fired with a firm grip to actuate the grip safety if the side safety is off.  Pulling the trigger fires the round, cycles the slide back, recocking the hammer making it ready to be released again to strip another round. At this point too, the pistol’s side safety can be put on and the hammer lowered or left in the “cocked and locked” condition.  Again familiarization with the 1911 action and sequence is necessary for safe and proficient operation.  It is easier to do and learn than to describe in writing. Lastly, here are our recommended accessories for a 1911: PRODUCTS FEATURES Best Grip Best Grip Magpul MOE 1911 TSP Grip Panels Grips to provide better control Simple Install Grips Black, Gray, Green or Dark Earth Color Check Price on Amazon.com Best Sight Best Sight Novak Tritium Front Sight for 1911 Our Favorite Sight for 1911 Bright, Tritium Dot Dovetail Mounted Check Price on Brownells.com Parrish Auto Bushing Comp for 1911 Best 1911 Comp Quick Install For All Calibers Check Price on Brownells.com Best Trigger Best Trigger 1911 Trigger Our Favorite Trigger for 1911 Precision machined aluminum 3-hole shoe provides an even lighter trigger pull Check Price on Brownells.com Summary Commentary As you can see, these two pistols are completely different designs primarily as either single or double action mechanisms.  Preppers will need to decide which system will work better or easier for them.  I naturally recommend that potential buyers check out both pistols thoroughly, handle them and then shoot them both before purchasing one or more. For solo preppers, teams or tribes, I suggest picking one or the other and not to mix types for the entire group.  I strongly advocate standardization of pistols, calibers, magazines, holsters, cleaning gear, and other gear related to SHTF self-defensive, protective or offensive weapons.  If you select the .45 ACP as your heavy pistol choice, pick one of these two. Photos By: TBY , John J. Woods, CA Meyers Other interesting articles: Glock – Ultimate Survival Pistol in 2020 Survival Debate: Pocket Carry vs. Concealed Carry Survival Debate: .308 Win vs. .223 Rem Survival Debate: .223 Rem VS .300 AAC-Blackout

The AR-15 Toolbox in your Pocket: Multitasker Multi-tool

The Multitasker Series 3 is designed specifically for the AR-15. ‘Wait, what? A multi-tool designed for the AR-15?’ Yes; and now that I have had the opportunity to physically hold the touch it, gaze at it and use it; I would like to share my thoughts and experiences with it and explain its features. Aesthetics Some of you may already know that I am a big fan of aesthetics in my gear. Although aesthetics may not be particularly important when it comes to tools, it doesn’t mean I can’t still be impressed by them. I appreciated that even the Multitasker box and packaging was of high quality. Upon opening it, I saw that the Multitasker was securely and safely resting in dense foam that was cut to form and shape of the Multitasker. It was almost as if after removing the box top, the Multitasker was being presented to me. Here you can see the laser engraved logo and slip resistant textured G10 grips on the Multitasker. Once I removed it from its foam nest, I noticed that the deep, dark and glossy black color appeared to be flawless all the way around. I also noticed that the bold, laser engraved Multitasker logo was proudly displayed on the knife blade. Ok, ok, I know. I am getting a little bit lost in the beauty of this tool but if you ever get the chance to see one in person, you will more than likely experience it too. Let’s move on to the features of the Multitasker Series 3. Features The Multitasker features G10 grips which is the same material my VZ grips that I use on my 1911. The grips are textured and kind of resemble the appearance of carbon fiber. In between the two grips of the Multitasker is a sandwich of several tools, some of which have more than one use or purpose. Here is a list of the tools in a Multitasker: The needle nose pliers of the Multitasker are CNC machined and feature replaceable wire cutter inserts. With all of the tools unfolded and included bits, you can see all of the possible uses for the Multitasker. – Needle nose pliers with wire cutters (replaceable inserts) – 1/4″ Standard screwdriver head – M4 castle nut spanner wrench and bottle opener – 3″ Locking knife blade (D2 steel and you have the option of either straight or partially serrated) – 3/8″ Box wrench (perfect for my LaRue mounts) – 1/2″ Hex wrench (for use on scope rings) – Carbon scraper/lug scraper – 3/32″ Pin punch (tip is removable and other items can be attached to the 8-32 male threads) – Magnetic 1/4″ bit holder that comes included with an A2 style 4 prong front sight adjustment tool (worked with my Magpul BUIS just fine) Also in the box with the Multitasker are the included bits that fit in the magnetic bit holder. Those bits consist of various sized torx bits, hex bits, standard bits and one phillips bit. Final Thoughts The Multitasker Series 3 multi-tool has almost everything you would need for servicing your AR-15 (or M4/M-16) when at the range or out in the field. I am confident that placing one of these tools in either my range bag or bugout bag will allow me to service my AR-15 completely minus removing the barrel. I could literally use the Multitasker for removing my rail, butt-stock, castle nut and end plate, push out my trigger or hammer pins, remove my flash hider or compensator, adjust my optics, sights and optic mounts. For me, knowing that I am covered for tools when not at home gives me peace of mind. The fact that all of those said tools are all in one pocket sized multi-tool is impresses me. I can honestly say that I will not go to the range with my AR-15 without having a Multitasker in my range bag. Here you can see the two different blade options for the Multitasker. Image courtesy of rainierarms.com "The Multitasker Series" 3 multi-tool retails for $140.00 and is not available directly from Multitasker. However, I have typically found them in stock at Brownells and Rainier Arms .

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Putting a pistol caliber cartridge in a rifle is easy…but a rifle round in a pistol?  Now that takes a bit more effort… In a world of 9mm AR-15s and 10mm carbines , ammo is no longer confined to it’s standard “handgun” or “rifle” designation. (L to R) . 22LR, 9mm, Five-Seven, 5.